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Skilled professionals in fields like law and accounting don’t necessarily think about sales when they think about growing their business. But a lawyer’s business development process isn’t different from a sales process – you want to grow revenue, find new prospective clients, and build your book of business. The difference is that instead of selling goods, what you’re selling is yourself and your expertise. You’re naturally entrepreneurial, and you want to grow your business. You just don’t quite know how.

Do you spend too much time with prospects who don’t buy, and on “unpaid consulting”?

Is your knowledge valuable enough to create interest, but you have problems turning interest into clients? People know you’re an expert, and they want your help. But can you turn that expertise, and people’s interest in it, into actual business? Or do you waste time helping customers who will never buy from you?

Do you have problems expanding your customer base?

Are you unable or unmotivated to prospect? Do you know how to maximize the relationships that you already have? Does poor qualifying of prospects lead to wasting time with people who won’t – or can’t – buy from you?

Do you develop plans and strategies for prospects, or just hope they’ll bite?

Rather than qualifying your prospects before engaging them, do you just go? When you encounter a possible customer do you just hope they’ll get interested, or do you sell them on your business? Do you generally close the deals you start, or do you end up making a lot of proposals on business you don’t end up getting?

Do you lack a systematic way of selling?

When talking with customers, do you just wing it? Or do you have a plan for every step of your sales process? Are you prepared to answer customers’ objections? Do you observe the parts of the sales funnel?

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